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What has 8 legs and is better than you'd expect?

sunny 72 °F
View Eastern Mediterranean Trip on sellnow's travel map.

Our first day in Santorini was a relaxing one – after sleeping in, we made eggs for breakfast and ate on the patio overlooking the beautiful caldera view. Nate and I love big breakfasts, and this is the closest we have come to one since we left. It was wonderful! We also had orange juice and even though it was from a carton, because it didn’t have any added sugars or preservatives, it was the best juice I have ever had. From there we set out for Fira, the largest town on Santorini which was just a 20 minute walk along the cliff from our place. The path is peppered with restaurants and little gift shops, so it was slow going as I wanted to do a little shopping as well. Nate gave in early on and said Santorini was my place to shop and get in a little beach time, so I had to take full advantage of it.
The white houses almost look like snow on top of the hills

The white houses almost look like snow on top of the hills


Taking a break on the cliff walk to Fira

Taking a break on the cliff walk to Fira


I think this was set up for a perfect picture

I think this was set up for a perfect picture


Nice view

Nice view

Late afternoon, we started to get hungry so we stopped for a Greek salad. I am not quite sure why we hadn’t had one yet (I think we were too busy eating gyros), but it sounded perfect. The greek salads here include tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, capers, olives and feta cheese, all tossed with some herbs, olive oil and a little vinegar. It was heavenly. I think it was a combination of a refreshing salad on a warm day along with the fact that we hadn’t really had much for fruits and veggies since we left.
Hearty greek salad

Hearty greek salad


Take a burro ride down to the old port and back up, only 588 steps

Take a burro ride down to the old port and back up, only 588 steps


They even count the steps for you, so you can keep track

They even count the steps for you, so you can keep track


Everyone uses local stones for sidewalk mosaics

Everyone uses local stones for sidewalk mosaics

Before we left that morning, Nate had asked our apartment owner about cooking octopus. She grew up on Santorini and is the nicest, most hospitable person we have ever met. She gave Nate directions on how to cook Octopus, and if you know Nate, you know that was enough to make him want to try making it himself. While in town, we found a larger grocery store and sure enough they had frozen octopus. We were told that the frozen is actually better as the fresh is often very chewy because usually a few days old by the time it gets to the grocery store. So we bought ourselves an octopus to try out for dinner.

While it thawed, we sipped local wine and ate a few olives. Unless you enjoy really sweet wines (both red and white), Santorini wines are absolutely terrible. I am not sure what it is, it says dry on the label but it was far from. The directions we were given, and I confirmed online, are to let the octopus cook in a covered pot for 1-2 hours and that is it. If you over cook it, it gets really chewy, so you have to be careful. We sipped our terrible wine while it stewed and because we made it on a one burner hot plate; we didn’t have any side dishes beyond the olives we snacked on. Soon enough, it was done – and it actually wasn’t too bad. I was a little hesitant but said I would try it, and the texture was much better than I thought. It is actually very meaty, not too chewy and besides it being a little salty for me (a result of letting it cook out its juices and then re-absorb them) it was actually quite good. We finished off the meal with a slice of baklava, and as the sun went it down the breeze got chilly so it was off to bed.
Before the octopus heads into the pot

Before the octopus heads into the pot


Bon Apetit!

Bon Apetit!

Posted by sellnow 21:15 Archived in Greece Tagged santorini octopus fira

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